NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS

North Mississippi Allstars formed in 1996; the product of a special time for modern Mississippi country blues. Brothers Luther and Cody Dickinson soaked up the music of their father, Memphis legend, Jim Dickinson, and absorbed the North Mississippi legacy while playing and shaking it down in the juke joints with their blues ancestors. R.L. Burnside, Junior Kimbrough, Otha Turner and their musical families while at their peak, making classic records and touring the world. Eventually, Luther (guitar, vocals) and Cody (drums, vocals) formed the North Mississippi Allstars and pioneered their own brand of blues-infused rock and roll.

The North Mississippi Allstars released their debut album, Shake Hands With Shorty, in the spring of 2000. Their debut proved to be a success and earned them a Grammy nomination for ‘Best Contemporary Blues Album’. After earning 2 more Grammy nominations in the same category for 51 Phantom (2001) and Electric Blue Watermelon (2005), the North Mississippi Allstars earned the reputation as one of the most intriguing acts to emerge from the loam of Southern blues and roots rock.

The band released their eight studio album, Prayer for Peace, in 2017, which was recorded across the US at six different studios. Guests on the album included bassist Oteil Burbridge, Graeme Lesh, vocalist Sharisse Norman, bassist Dominic Davis (Jack White), and singer/fife player Shardé Thomas, the granddaughter of Otha Turner. The album hit number one on the Billboard Blues Albums Chart that June, and the fellas have been touring since making stops at festivals including Wanee, New Orleans Jazz Fest, Panic en la Playa and more!

We’re not a political band. I’m not good at that type of thing. One thing R.L. Burnside taught us was that you can play the saddest song in the world, but if you do it with a smile on your face, you can make a whole roomful of people dance. That’s what this record is about. Making people dance. Making them want to rub up against each other.
— Luther Dickinson, North Mississippi Allstars

PEOPLE’S BLUES OF RICHMOND

People’s Blues of Richmond (or PBR as they are affectionately referred to by their fans) is one of those rare three-pieces that somehow conjures the sonic power and visual intensity of a thunderstorm. Think Jimi Hendrix Experience meets MC5. They take psychedelic blues rock to a different level with a lyrical element seldom found in the genre. Think Bob Dylan writing lyrics for Black Sabbath songs. It’s hard to imagine until it’s right in your face. Then it’s hard to forget.

Their 2016 12-song release Quit or Die showcased a travel-hardened band at a crossroads. With drugs taking their inevitable toll on three young men on an endless search for a good time, this trio had a choice to make and Quit or Die is a declaration of their purpose as artists above all else.

In the two years since, they’ve found themselves opening for Gregg Allman, ZZ Top, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, The Revivalists, and Papadosio and playing venues like Red Rocks, 3 sets at Electric Forest, 2 appearances at Lockn, The Brooklyn Bowl, The National, and The Norva.

Before Quit or Die, PBR had a cult following built around their album Good Time Suicide. It was a big, dark, manic sounding album full of in-your-face riffs and gut-wrenching song writing. It was followed shortly thereafter by the trio heading to Valdosta, GA to meet and record with Mark Neill (The Black Keys, Old 97s, J Roddy Walston and the Business). They did two songs with Mark and learned a lot about recording that they put to use when they returned home to Richmond to record Quit or Die. - Glide Magazine

 
 

Hailing from Richmond, VA, The Trongone Band is touring in support of their 2017 debut album, “Keys to the House”, released on Harmonized Records. With a sound that Paste Magazine likens to the “freak-outs of My Morning Jacket with the Muscle Shoals-inspired Leslie speakers and The Band’s narrative storytelling”, The Trongone Band is turning heads and making an impact on the Southern Rock ‘n’ Soul and Americana scenes.

Formed by brothers Andrew and Johnny Trongone with father John Sr on bass, The Trongone Band (tron-GO-knee) has grown from a family affair to a full on touring machine with the addition of keyboardist Ben “Wolfe” White and bassist Chip Hale. In the words of Live for Live Music, “the quartet has come together to create an old-school and all-in-the-family sound reminiscent of The Allman Brothers while still keeping it fresh with their cutting edge original compositions that also infuse funk and blues into the mix.”

Keeping with the homegrown vibe, the band nestled into the woods outside of RVA, tapping into Montrose Recording’s Flickinger console, one of only seven remaining in the world. Known as the console that revolutionized the recording industry in the 60s & 70s, the Flickinger provided the warm sounds that turned into “Keys to the House” and brought to life what MusicFestNews described as “imagery of boxcar drifters, rolling hills and dirt roads that are easy to close your eyes and get lost in”.

Summer and Fall of 2017 saw The Trongone Band taking “Keys to the House” on the road while touring in support of stalwarts including Umphrey’s McGee, Reckless Kelly, American Aquarium and Cris Jacobs, Having graced the stages of Virginia’s Roosterwalk and FloydFest, Tennessee’s Riverbend Music Festival, The Allman Brothers’ Peach Festival in Pennsylvania, Atlanta’s Sweetwater 420 Fest and Macon’s “Big House Presents Summer Jam”, the band took the show abroad and completed their first full European Tour to close out 2018. This four-piece ensemble may not all be related, but with a chemistry so emphatically discernible, it's fair to call them brothers.